1977 Hydrodyne Tournament Skier 18 OB Rebuild

Discussion in 'Hydrodyne® Boats' started by barefootrocker, Dec 15, 2014.

  1. jim

    jim Hydrodyne 18 Specialist

    Joined:
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    2,291
    Location:
    FL
    Boat Model and Year:
    77 Dyne 18 I/O converted to Outboard
    I like the model. I think you can re-enforce the deck joint to be stronger than new. The deck is pretty thin there. I have always felt that a good glass man could make it look right. The main concern is the non skid texture. I am not very concerned about that.

    I never met a windshield I could like. You might want to try it without a windshield first. You might like it. A lot of them have the top frame right in the line of sight. You might consider that in your design. I am not comfortable looking through it either.

    jim
     
  2. tj309

    tj309 Composite Specialist

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2010
    Messages:
    396
    Location:
    LA (lower Alabama)
    Boat Model and Year:
    1972 18' Hydrodyne
    Ski Team:
    Former Hodag Water shows
    After looking thru your entire post Barefoot I noticed that your boat is a '77. Therefore it should have an end grain balsa core which is good news in that even though the stringers and transom are shot the core may be OK. Check it thoroghly and all over because if you replace the stringers and transom over a bad core you will wind up with a heavy moneypit. I also see that you checked out my project under the thread "1972 Keel Up Restoration. I got alot of help here but am also going where no one here has been by using very modern materials at a greater cost. Your marine plywood transom will be fine as long as you waterproof it by filling screw holes with sealer before installing screws and waterproof the motor mounting holes. Check out Mark Bano's restoration on the restoration thread. It is on the 2nd page. Lots of good stuff there that I used. There are so many tips here such as having alot of milk cartons cut for fiberglass resin mixing and using a drill with a hunk of wire to mix resin like an egg beater.

    Jim I have to respectfully disagree on the deck joint being stronger than new. The only way that would be possible is to re-attach the forward deck and turn the whole boat up side down and glass the crap out of the 2 joints. I do agree that even an average fiberglass worker with a sander could make the joint disappear on the outside if one were to dispense with the non-skid texture.
     
  3. barefootrocker

    barefootrocker Hydrodyner

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2014
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    17
    Location:
    Central Wisconsin
    Ski Team:
    CWWSST
    tj309-
    Unfortunately we cut the motorwell early on, about 6 inches ahead of the front of it, so that too is a moot point for now. I'm not terribly concerned as the boat gains strength from transom, motorwell and sides forming a box structure, which will all still be there and we plan to take advantage of. This will be identical to if we removed the entire deck with the exception of those two joints on the top of the gunnel. We will be glassing the deck back on as standard, and we are also considering adding gussets from the transom to the hull, tying the motorwell to the hull and transom as you did, and also reinforcing the front of the motorwell to make the freestanding portion of this box section more rigid. Not sure which of these we will all be doing yet. Also, yes you are correct that the 77 was the end-grain balsa cored variety, and the core was sound and dry throughout with the exception of a couple inches at the rear by the transom which we are addressing. We also aren't happy with the existing strength of the deck to hull joint as it is, so we are going to reinforce this as well, probably all the way up to the dashboard area.

    Jim-
    The windshield will be one of the last things we do. I have the feeling that may be a scenario where it's water ready and the windshield is left to do yet, and the unanimous decision is to get the thing on the lake. If we do go with a windshield, the goal would be to look over it but have it cut the wind, like a small motorcycle windshield. I also prefer not to look through a windshield but rather over it. I believe it's a trade off. The windshield would make it look more modern but would take away from the original look.
     
  4. tj309

    tj309 Composite Specialist

    Joined:
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    396
    Location:
    LA (lower Alabama)
    Boat Model and Year:
    1972 18' Hydrodyne
    Ski Team:
    Former Hodag Water shows
    Barefoot - it sounds to me that you have a good understanding of the loads and structural soundness and your plan sounds good. I'm with Jim on the windshield issue - I prefer none. At typical ski speeds - even barefoot speeds you don't need one.
     
  5. jim

    jim Hydrodyne 18 Specialist

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    Location:
    FL
    Boat Model and Year:
    77 Dyne 18 I/O converted to Outboard
    barefootrocker,

    If it makes you feel better, Tom Miller has repaired Dynes by cutting the deck. He builds new ones.

    A look over windshield is the way to go if you need a windshield in my opinion.

    jim
     
  6. kevinb

    kevinb Elite Hydrodyner

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2006
    Messages:
    431
    Location:
    Brookfield, WI
    Boat Model and Year:
    75 HD 18' I/O SOLD & 1985 HD 20' (Boat #2) I/O 350
    Ski Team:
    NA
    Don't need to sort the issues re cutting the top deck. It can be redone and not likely an issue, more cosmetic in the end. Just make sure the bottom hull gets properly supported.

    Regarding the windshield issues (on going debate), I have owned both with and without (73 18 without, 75 with, and current 20 with) and there is a safety/audible issue that is definitely more positive with the windshield at SL speed. I definitely need the feedback from the spotter regarding what is happening behind the boat at SL speed and need to hear the dialog transfer plus 32 mph. If on a private lake or limited access water, a bubble top without a windshield could work but not for the lakes around Milwaukee or busy water ways, unless very early in the am, and not on the weekends, IMHO.
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2014
  7. timsprandel

    timsprandel Elite Hydrodyner

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2006
    Messages:
    269
    Location:
    Illinois-Near Chicago
    Boat Model and Year:
    1974 Mirro Craft/1978 Hydrodyne Tournament Skier
    Mr. Barefoot,
    Thanks for taking on the project, especially in cooperation with your father. I have a 1978 18' Tournament Skier (no windshield) that I am just goofy enough to run on Lake Michigan 14 miles north of New Buffalo. Mine currently has a 1990 Johnson GT 200 that makes it move out very nicely. The transom has wet wood below the waterline and there is a sure possibility that the underfloor foam is saturated. The dyne also rides on a "batwing" trailer. They were built by Hydrodyne and are quite sturdy.

    Reference the matter of using Seacast...There is a thread on Correct Craft Fans.com that allegedly delves deeply into the product giving it a performance review. Please keep in mind that this is the interweb just like in the old movie West World-Where nothing can go wrogn. Caveat Emptor. IMHO, the Coosa is expensive, but worth it as it is a fiberglass product that resin and roving will adhere to exceptionally well. It will never rot. You have purchased and cut out your Marine plywood. It is OEM spec.
    Be careful that you do not miss your Holiday festivities as you are forging ahead on your way to building a most excellent boat. I would spend my last bits of money fueling up my Dyne rather than buying food.
    One small anecdote. I have been privileged to have been a spectator at the Aqua Bowl in Minocqua since the early 1960's. As the show would get rolling, the announcer would tell the crowd to watch as the two 18' twin rigs would hit full throttles about 15 feet apart heading straight for the clubhouse. It always seemed that the announcer could just reach out and touch the props as all 4 lower units were parallel to the water's surface; the west boat turning hard left and the east boat going hard right. They don't do that any more, probably due to insurance concerns. Since those days it has been absolutely necessary to own and operate a Dyne.
    My wife was against it, but she lost that battle.
     
  8. ski38off

    ski38off Photo of the Month

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2011
    Messages:
    55
    Boat Model and Year:
    1976 18', 200 hp, and 1977 18' 150 hp twin rig
    Ski Team:
    Lake Shelby Skiers
    Wood stringers and plywood floor would be the least costly route. One boat has the footwell and one does not. The footwell is a bit more comfortable. I would not put any foam between the stringers. Mine came out weighing about the same as concrete. I used 3/4 Divinicell PVC foam for the stringers and floor. They are glassed all over and on both sides. I should have used denser foam which is stiffer, but ended up with an additional layer of glass to get the rigidity. I did use wood for the transom but it is sealed as best I could and the boat never stays in the water. I will echo others in that I don't think this boat should ever have a windshield. They just look goofy. Goggles work just fine if necessary. And I agree, the original deck to hull joint was sub par at best.
     
  9. tj309

    tj309 Composite Specialist

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2010
    Messages:
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    Location:
    LA (lower Alabama)
    Boat Model and Year:
    1972 18' Hydrodyne
    Ski Team:
    Former Hodag Water shows
    Timsprandel - I have also been priveleged to see 2 Dynes rocket towards the stands and then do that turn on a dime and expose the 4 loweres to the stands at Hodag Watershows in Rhinelander, WI. I then put a 5 and a 5.5hp on the back of my Dad's 12' Alumicraft rowboat and had a blast. I eventually joined the watershow as a pickup boat driver and did manage to get my hands on the Dyne. There is nothing that compares to driving a twin rig and as in your case my wife was against me getting a Dyne (it is now my 3rd boat). She lost that battle. I have pretty much always owned a boat and when I got my lake cabin I had my go fast Venom which she hated. So I had to get her a pontoon boat which she loved. Then I got the Dyne but it turned out to need major work and that is where I am at. At my age going fast is not that important but I sure as hell love that Venom. When the Dyne is done I probably will like it better than the Venom.
     
  10. jim

    jim Hydrodyne 18 Specialist

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    Location:
    FL
    Boat Model and Year:
    77 Dyne 18 I/O converted to Outboard
    It is good to see this conversation continue.

    jim
     

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